If Dubai Is Bad, Why Come To Dubai, Shk Mohammed Asks!!!

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Apr 20, 2009
Tom Jones wrote:The UAE lost this guy forever, even though he was effectively an Emarati in every aspect except for his nationality papers. People like these should rightfully be entitled to the UAE citizenship. Giving them citizenship is also in the best interest of this country which needs to combat the fact that the Emarati nationals are becoming, more and more, a very tiny minority in their own country.8) 8)


I don't disagree with the idea at all, it would be a nice reward to the people who have worked here for a long time, and also would keep skilled labour from leaving, but isn't the actual wish of the UAE probably to keep their Arab identity, and giving citizenship to Pakistanis, British, Australians, etc. is in fact diluting this aim?

Speedhump
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Apr 20, 2009
Speedhump wrote:
Tom Jones wrote:The UAE lost this guy forever, even though he was effectively an Emarati in every aspect except for his nationality papers. People like these should rightfully be entitled to the UAE citizenship. Giving them citizenship is also in the best interest of this country which needs to combat the fact that the Emarati nationals are becoming, more and more, a very tiny minority in their own country.8) 8)


I don't disagree with the idea at all, it would be a nice reward to the people who have worked here for a long time, and also would keep skilled labour from leaving, but isn't the actual wish of the UAE probably to keep their Arab identity, and giving citizenship to Pakistanis, British, Australians, etc. is in fact diluting this aim?


Well said. Keep it up
Anosh
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Apr 20, 2009
The situation described by Tom Jones is very typical here. "Returning" to India or Pakistan for these ppl. is the same as a ticket to the Moon. So the only option is emigration to CAN, AUS or NZ. Definitely they are well-educated relatively young (25-32 years old) guys....
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Apr 20, 2009
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canuckbid wrote:Hello. I think alot of people forget that they are in a different country than their own and don't respect the local laws and customs. They think everything should be the same as their home country. Wake up and smell the coffee. You shoud respect the countries culture or don't be there.

See my blog here: http://canuckbid.wordpress.com/
Suggestions? Mike


Your statement really doesn't make a lot of sense in the context of this thread.


I agree when in Rome, do as the Romans do
mckenzie
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Apr 20, 2009
naruto wrote:michaeldubai do u get paid for the work u do here in dubai ?


No - I work for free.
michaeldubai
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Apr 20, 2009
Speedhump wrote:
Tom Jones wrote:The UAE lost this guy forever, even though he was effectively an Emarati in every aspect except for his nationality papers. People like these should rightfully be entitled to the UAE citizenship. Giving them citizenship is also in the best interest of this country which needs to combat the fact that the Emarati nationals are becoming, more and more, a very tiny minority in their own country.8) 8)


I don't disagree with the idea at all, it would be a nice reward to the people who have worked here for a long time, and also would keep skilled labour from leaving, but isn't the actual wish of the UAE probably to keep their Arab identity, and giving citizenship to Pakistanis, British, Australians, etc. is in fact diluting this aim?

No I didn’t say that they should give citizenship to everyone who worked in the UAE for a long time.

I fully understand the UAE’s concern about preserving their national identity, culture, heritage, language, religion…etc. They surely have every right to do so.

However, a guy like the one I mentioned who is a Moslem, born and raised here, lived all his life in this country, well educated and, in actual fact, is an Emarati in every respect except for not having the right documents… is indeed fully qualified to be become an Emarati citizen.

I have met Emaratis whose families originally came from Iran and India. They seem to be fully assimilated in the Emarati society, culturally and otherwise. Remember, once people have the legitimacy to live here permanently and call this place their home, they will have the desire to assimilate, and if they don’t, their offspring will most certainly do.

8) 8)
Tom Jones
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Apr 21, 2009
Tom Jones wrote:
Speedhump wrote:
Tom Jones wrote:The UAE lost this guy forever, even though he was effectively an Emarati in every aspect except for his nationality papers. People like these should rightfully be entitled to the UAE citizenship. Giving them citizenship is also in the best interest of this country which needs to combat the fact that the Emarati nationals are becoming, more and more, a very tiny minority in their own country.8) 8)


I don't disagree with the idea at all, it would be a nice reward to the people who have worked here for a long time, and also would keep skilled labour from leaving, but isn't the actual wish of the UAE probably to keep their Arab identity, and giving citizenship to Pakistanis, British, Australians, etc. is in fact diluting this aim?

No I didn’t say that they should give citizenship to everyone who worked in the UAE for a long time.

I fully understand the UAE’s concern about preserving their national identity, culture, heritage, language, religion…etc. They surely have every right to do so.

However, a guy like the one I mentioned who is a Moslem, born and raised here, lived all his life in this country, well educated and, in actual fact, is an Emarati in every respect except for not having the right documents… is indeed fully qualified to be become an Emarati citizen.

I have met Emaratis whose families originally came from Iran and India. They seem to be fully assimilated in the Emarati society, culturally and otherwise. Remember, once people have the legitimacy to live here permanently and call this place their home, they will have the desire to assimilate, and if they don’t, their offspring will most certainly do.

8) 8)


The Emirati population growth can be attributed to a fairly large amount of mixed marriages. The majority 99% are men marrying expats and 1% women marrying expats who coverted to Islam.

So, just as an example, which does happen, an Emirati marries a fillipino girl. She is given the passport. They have children Emirati/philipino. They get passports. So all this up in arms about locals perserving their Arab ancestry is for what? When you look at the children as a result of a union between Emirati and filipino you will see two different countries in their faces and they will be considered Emiratis. So when defending locals and lifestyle and culture, do you include the expats married to Emiratis who became entitled to the passport by virtue of marring an Emirati?
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Apr 21, 2009
Bora Bora wrote:
Tom Jones wrote:
Speedhump wrote:
Tom Jones wrote:The UAE lost this guy forever, even though he was effectively an Emarati in every aspect except for his nationality papers. People like these should rightfully be entitled to the UAE citizenship. Giving them citizenship is also in the best interest of this country which needs to combat the fact that the Emarati nationals are becoming, more and more, a very tiny minority in their own country.8) 8)


I don't disagree with the idea at all, it would be a nice reward to the people who have worked here for a long time, and also would keep skilled labour from leaving, but isn't the actual wish of the UAE probably to keep their Arab identity, and giving citizenship to Pakistanis, British, Australians, etc. is in fact diluting this aim?

No I didn’t say that they should give citizenship to everyone who worked in the UAE for a long time.

I fully understand the UAE’s concern about preserving their national identity, culture, heritage, language, religion…etc. They surely have every right to do so.

However, a guy like the one I mentioned who is a Moslem, born and raised here, lived all his life in this country, well educated and, in actual fact, is an Emarati in every respect except for not having the right documents… is indeed fully qualified to be become an Emarati citizen.

I have met Emaratis whose families originally came from Iran and India. They seem to be fully assimilated in the Emarati society, culturally and otherwise. Remember, once people have the legitimacy to live here permanently and call this place their home, they will have the desire to assimilate, and if they don’t, their offspring will most certainly do.

8) 8)


The Emirati population growth can be attributed to a fairly large amount of mixed marriages. The majority 99% are men marrying expats and 1% women marrying expats who coverted to Islam.

So, just as an example, which does happen, an Emirati marries a fillipino girl. She is given the passport. They have children Emirati/philipino. They get passports. So all this up in arms about locals perserving their Arab ancestry is for what? When you look at the children as a result of a union between Emirati and filipino you will see two different countries in their faces and they will be considered Emiratis. So when defending locals and lifestyle and culture, do you include the expats married to Emiratis who became entitled to the passport by virtue of marring an Emirati?


Offcourse it should include anyone holding a passport.....It's a valid question...I guess only the offspring of such marriages could best answer it.
You stated that Emirati women get married to non Emirati men. Lets say the woman gets married to a male Filipino....I'm curious would the Emirati community accept him?
Misery Called Life
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Apr 21, 2009
Just about every culture slowly assimilates people of other races as the world has shrunk incredibly in the last fifty years and jet travel has become the norm. So it's not strange that the Emirates will give passports and therefore nationality to a marriage partner, their citizens will demand it. I guess it's the rate at which this happens (or is allowed to happen) that affects local identity. For a small and outward looking country like the UAE its effects will become obvious more quickly though.
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Apr 21, 2009
THOSE WHO THINK THAT THEY WILL EARN MORE WITH LESS WORK IN DUBAI NOW THEY THINK THAT ITS NOT A PLACE TO EARN MORE AND THEY HAVE TO WORK HARD TO LIVE HERE
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Apr 21, 2009
newdubai wrote:THOSE WHO THINK THAT THEY WILL EARN MORE WITH LESS WORK IN DUBAI NOW THEY THINK THAT ITS NOT A PLACE TO EARN MORE AND THEY HAVE TO WORK HARD TO LIVE HERE


Sorry I don't agree even one percent with that. Everyone I know has always worked hard for their money here, and long hours. But the rewards have been there in the past, and now for a lot of people they aren't any more.
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Apr 21, 2009
Speedhump wrote:Just about every culture slowly assimilates people of other races as the world has shrunk incredibly in the last fifty years and jet travel has become the norm.


Speedy, expain me please what you mean speacking about local culture and identity.

Dubai has been a trading centre for century and the core of the trade was Persian merchants before establishing UAE. So big part of current citizens has Persian roots.

Tell me also why 90% expats is not a threat for the identity but a few thousand well-educated Dubai-born guys is.
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Apr 21, 2009
Red Chief wrote:
Speedhump wrote:Just about every culture slowly assimilates people of other races as the world has shrunk incredibly in the last fifty years and jet travel has become the norm.


Speedy, expain me please what you mean speacking about local culture and identity.

Dubai has been a trading centre for century and the core of the trade was Persian merchants before establishing UAE. So big part of current citizens has Persian roots.

Tell me also why 90% expats is not a threat for the identity but a few thousand well-educated Dubai-born guys is.


Every culture is affected by other cultures, we all know that, but are you saying there is no real Emirati identity or culture? I think Emiratis would be interested to hear that. Please explain.

If you're telling Emiratis they are Persians and not Arabs I'd love to hear their reply.
Speedhump
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Apr 21, 2009
I asked your point. As soon as you use some words like Emirati identity and threat of the identity I guess you can explain their meanings.
Red Chief
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Apr 21, 2009
The Gulf States have come a long way; FAST.. It's now time to think about where they're going.. :?: :arrow:
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