Racism Towards Different Races?

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Racism towards different races? Aug 02, 2007
I'm curious to know if in Dubai, there is a presence of racism towards different racial backgrounds. I'm living in America and we have people of different races and backgrounds living and working together with little or less problems than elsewhere. Is it the same in Dubai? Will a black person or person of african descent be able to find a job Dubai without a problem? Is race a big factor in Dubai? How are people treated based on skin color ?

Starzel2004
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Aug 02, 2007
where in america are you staying?

in my opinion, if you are going into the professional field your skin colour isnt going to be a factor in you getting the job or not and dubai is pretty tolerant....but i am sure some others will disagree if you just read around the forums...
bushra21
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reply Aug 02, 2007
bushra21 wrote:where in america are you staying?

in my opinion, if you are going into the professional field your skin colour isnt going to be a factor in you getting the job or not and dubai is pretty tolerant....but i am sure some others will disagree if you just read around the forums...


Thats nice. Did you see black people there?

I'm staying in NYC.
Starzel2004
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Aug 02, 2007
Starzel2004 - there is racism in Dubai, but is largely pointed at Asians (which is wrong, but they way it is).

As a black (man or women) I can assure you that you will have no problems, I know some local emirates who are black (which is from the close distance to Africa I believe).
jabbajabba
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Aug 12, 2007
HEre in Dubai, racism is absolutlely encouraged or rather practice...

brItish are very well paid, no question about it
locals are very well paid
asian are underpaid eventhough there are much qualified for the position

so what the heck, live with it....you cannot do anything about it :x :lol:
femme
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Aug 12, 2007
femme wrote:....asian are underpaid eventhough there are much qualified for the position...


ummm there are 20,000 Indian dollar millionaires in Dubai, most higher end bars, clubs and tons of franchised restaurants are owned by people whose heritage is from the sub continent. (technically locals are Asian too but you seem so dense that we’ll leave that point aside)

You’re behind the eight ball if you’re a certain nationality true but the day you use that as an excuse is the day you deserve to be lower paid.

Why are Indians, Paks, etc paid lower? they accept it.
fayz
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Aug 12, 2007
^^wow fayz you hit the spot right there with that post
Bleakus
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Aug 12, 2007
I have this Filipino friend who just arrived here in Dubai, sent here by his company back home (an american company though). He told to me (i think more of being disgusted than to brag) that his american and british (generally white) colleagues here just couldn't believe that this little brown guy is in that high a position in the company and is being paid that much.
As if it's not possible. :roll:
yujinn
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Aug 12, 2007
yujinn wrote:I have this Filipino friend who just arrived here in Dubai, sent here by his company back home (an american company though). He told to me (i think more of being disgusted than to brag) that his american and british (generally white) colleagues here just couldn't believe that this little brown guy is in that high a position in the company and is being paid that much.
As if it's not possible. :roll:


So true! I've encountered the same scenario before. Their eyes usually become bigger if they found out you are well paid. :lol: As if asian people don't deserve to be paid well. :roll:

Oh i was invited for an interview once, and we're in the package negotiation stage. They're negotiating for my "asking package" with their sarcastic tone that i am asian and can survive with meager salary. I said to them, excuse me???! I can't under negotiate my skills. They kept on calling me for about a month asking me to consider. I said NO! and I tell them straight that I am happy working for a company that doesn't have reservations on asians.
SCY
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Aug 12, 2007
edit: just keeping someone's secret, you didn't see anything ;)
fayz
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Aug 13, 2007
edit: Glad not to know the secret.
SCY
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Aug 13, 2007
i agree that there is some type of racism in Dubai, but it wont affect you at all unless you want it to, once you get a good job, thats it, companies all over the world prefer certain nationalities..

my advice is: find a good job, and dont worry about anything, thats how you enjoy life :)
hamadl
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Racism towards different races? Aug 14, 2007
Let me be blunt because some of the replies do not answer my question.

Is there racism towards black people in dubai? Are there black people in Dubai?
Starzel2004
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Aug 14, 2007
specifically to black, very little. You'll likely face a lot less racism here then America
fayz
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Aug 14, 2007
oh and yes you do see black people here, even some locals are black.
fayz
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Aug 14, 2007
fayz wrote:You'll likely face a lot less racism here then America


Hehe, I don't think so. But I have to say that whatever racism might exist here is not really based on skin colour.
gtmash
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Aug 14, 2007
you haven't been to the south, for blacks I do think America is more racist than here, for SE Asians I would say here is more racist, imho.
fayz
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Aug 14, 2007
fayz wrote:you haven't been to the south, for blacks I do think America is more racist than here, for SE Asians I would say here is more racist, imho.


I lived in Atlanta for two years. Hail Georgia!

It's a matter of staying out of a few redneck areas. But then again, even decent white people avoided those village-like areas. But at least they have well-defined laws against racism.
gtmash
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Aug 14, 2007
hehehe, kewl. well I've never lived in the states so your opinion is probably the one to listen to, I've been to the states about 50 times, even once to Atlanta, I found people aren't racist to your face but there is a hidden tendency, people follow you more in stores, you notice people approach different ethnicities differently etc.

maybe it’s just that I look like a derelict.
fayz
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Aug 14, 2007
fayz wrote:maybe it’s just that I look like a derelict.


Yeah, possibly. :lol:

Although I really didn't hang in the top-class places like 5-star hotels and stuff. Just college campuses, fast food places, subway stations....the zoo. But mixed relationships was no big deal at all.
gtmash
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Aug 14, 2007
gtmash wrote:
fayz wrote:you haven't been to the south, for blacks I do think America is more racist than here, for SE Asians I would say here is more racist, imho.


I lived in Atlanta for two years. Hail Georgia!

It's a matter of staying out of a few redneck areas. But then again, even decent white people avoided those village-like areas. But at least they have well-defined laws against racism.


It really depends on where you are in the states. The south (blacks), north(almost anyone who isnt white), west (hispanics) and east coast(like the north)...

Anywhere you go you are going to find ignorant people, its just what you make of it...
bushra21
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Aug 18, 2007
:) Hi man,, do u wanna the best answer..


No Racism towards Black people because we have a lot of black UAE people here ..

I live in area which has many black Emirati people ,but not in dubai and we are as one family 8)
Peach_Girl
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Aug 19, 2007
racism is really a touche topic. and the word racist would be taboo in a melting pot like Dubai.

But is there Racism in Dubai? Hell yes! People here are as as racist as anyone else is in the world, Me included.

I admit that I'm a racist, and i don't mean the "nazi, klux klux clan" way. See folks, it's not about hate, but love. Nothing personal against other races, but i just prefer mine.

Race denotes a commonality. We share the same skintone, the same collective experiences. Your suffering is mine too, and we are bonded by this.

Why do you think Filipinos stick to Filipinos, Indians to Indian, Brits to Brits, Pakistans to Pakistans? Because all of them have something in common in a country where they are foreign.
Dai
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Sep 01, 2007
gtmash wrote:
fayz wrote:You'll likely face a lot less racism here then America


Hehe, I don't think so. But I have to say that whatever racism might exist here is not really based on skin colour.


Agreed.

In fact, a black American with a degree would be pretty much near the top of the totem pole in the UAE business world.

And right at the very top of the pole are local Emiratis who range in colour from snow-white to pitch black, and for whom colour doesn't form part of their identity.

I've certainly never seen even a hint of discrimination based on skin colour here.

But does discrimination exist? Hell yes. But it's based on nationality and culture rather than colour.

In fact, the concept of race is pretty much obsolete globally, and sooner rather than later people will stop using that stupid word, and its associated words 'racist' and 'racism'.

Race doesn't exist. You may struggle to get it, especially if you grew up in a culture with a strong emphasis on 'race'. But biological sciences have completely disproved the existence of race as a scientific construct.

It's interesting that the original question seemed to come from a US American. The US is trying to keep alive the myth that there are three major races: white, black and hispanic. Like apartheid South Africa persuaded its citizens that everyone in the world was either white, black (a different definition of black to the US one), coloured or Indian.

The sooner we get over these artificial categorisations the better.

So yes, the UAE is hyper-nationality-aware, to a very unhealthy degree, and this will fade over time. For now I think it's people's way of dealing with this huge confluence of diverse cultures that's happened in a relatively short space of time.
WaterWater
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Sep 05, 2007
Thanks for the posts everyone. I'm more informed, encouraged and my questions are answered. :-)

In fact, a black American with a degree would be pretty much near the top of the totem pole in the UAE business world.

And right at the very top of the pole are local Emiratis who range in colour from snow-white to pitch black, and for whom colour doesn't form part of their identity.

I've certainly never seen even a hint of discrimination based on skin colour here.

But does discrimination exist? Hell yes. But it's based on nationality and culture rather than colour.


Thanks.

The sooner we get over these artificial categorisations the better.


I agree.

specifically to black, very little. You'll likely face a lot less racism here then America.

oh and yes you do see black people here, even some locals are black.


Thanks.

Race denotes a commonality. We share the same skintone, the same collective experiences.


I disagree with that statement. And that person also said Dubai is a melting pot, so in this case, the person's definition of race is not in agreement.

race is: "a group of persons related by common descent or heredity."
commonality: "a sharing of features or characteristics in common; possession or manifestation of common attributes."

Therefore, these definitions do not necessarily go hand in hand.

I personally hang out with people outside of my race as much as my own race. In addition, people of our own nationality do not all stick together. Let me give an example: If you put two Chinese people in a group of Caucasian people, will those two Chinese people end up being the best of friends? No. Just because you are the same nationality as someone else, it doesn't mean that you are going to hit it off and be friends with that person.

Some people have prejudice and from there some develop racism (when you think your race is better than the rest). But that can be overcome when you accept it. Then give moral reasonings in order to stop prejudicial thoughts/actions.

Also, there are different skin tones of people in the same country.

If you are racist, your are racist, no matter what degree it is.
Starzel2004
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Oct 07, 2007
Just out of interest, do any of you socialise with Fillipinos?

Reason why i ask. I am your average Aussie living in Melbourne and have socialised with many Asians and Fillipinos over the years. The ones i have met i have found them to be very hospitable, honest and hard working including in business relationships. Some good friendships have developed over the years.

I have been shortlisted for a Managerial role in Dubai which will involve running a Department of 50 or more workers. Most are Fillipinos.
The agency made it clear to me that the owner only wanted to hire Aussie Expats in Management roles for the company. It appears to me that sensitivity towards other nationalities is a key factor.

What i found surprising during the 1st interview process was the emphasis the interviewer placed on racism. It appeared to be the main subject. I had to explain to her that there was not a racist bone in my body. Its not part of my vocabulary nore character.

Is this fairly normal from recruitment agencies?

After reading a few threads and visiting other forums it looks like there is alot of racial predudism towards other cultures in UAE.

Would this be a fairly correct assumption?

Cheers markco2 :D
markco2
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Aug 22, 2008
I'm an African American who recently moved to Dubai - 3 mths ago. I haven't experienced any outright racism especially not anything I experienced growing up in the US.

There are a great deal of Africans here as well. You will see plenty of dark skinned folks from all over the world.

When are you thinking of coming?
blackexplorer
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Aug 26, 2008
with this season summer heat
am already feeling black dude
bloody hot this summer
saeedz28
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Sep 22, 2008
Racism...it's only as much as you take, accept, and deal with it.

I always believe that in terms of work, it's a matter of proving yourself and trying to be indispensable to the company you work for. Yes, Asians or people from third-world countries probably need to work 10 times as much, but at the end of the day, if one is able to distinguished himself from the others, then the same principle of success will apply -- no matter where you are in this part of the world.

My mentor once told me “If the company is paying you AED 10.00, give your very best and work as if you are getting AED 20.00...and one day, you will wake up and get it. Continue to uphold the same principle not only in your earnings, but also in your achievement in every sector of your life...then you are bound to succeed.”

I am more than glad I learned it earlier in my life. There is no room for racism over me now. I just learned how to deal with it.
farthestpoint
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Sep 22, 2008
^ or maybe you just got lucky with your employer. hehe.

I don't think that principle applies in Dubai. If you're willing to be paid AED10 and work as if you're getting 20, then expect more work in the future instead.

3rd world people are desparate and, coupled with a lack of 'right' educational background and the fact that if they refuse, there'll be plenty more 3rd world suckers out there, will accept whatever they're offered.
As for westerners with western education, it's the other way around. If they refuse the offer - and they definitely can, there will always be other employers (suckers?) out there that is willing to offer more.

Recognition? It's established from the start: westerners= western education= more pay,
Respect? You can earn that definitely, but don't expect it to convert to dirhams.

It's just the way it is as I see it.
pinoy1
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Sep 22, 2008
pinoy1 wrote:^ or maybe you just got lucky with your employer. hehe.

I don't think that principle applies in Dubai. If you're willing to be paid AED10 and work as if you're getting 20, then expect more work in the future instead.

3rd world people are desparate and, coupled with a lack of 'right' educational background and the fact that if they refuse, there'll be plenty more 3rd world suckers out there, will accept whatever they're offered.
As for westerners with western education, it's the other way around. If they refuse the offer - and they definitely can, there will always be other employers (suckers?) out there that is willing to offer more.

Recognition? It's established from the start: westerners= western education= more pay,
Respect? You can earn that definitely, but don't expect it to convert to dirhams.

It's just the way it is as I see it.


I am so sorry to hear your story and opinion pinoy1 but I could not agree with your post here.

I had worked for M-I SWACO, a Smith/Schlumberger company dominated by westerners and men in the Oil & Gas Industry, the principle is the same.

I had worked for a local company owned by Arabs, with mixed nationalities from Russians, Germans, Arabs, Indians & Filipinos, the principle remains the same.

Right education? Ofcourse. And please do not undermine the education system of Asian or 3rd World countries. You should know better than that. Just look at the history. Just remember the Moon Buggy - one of the inventors is a Filipino - Mapuan, that is.

How do you expect to compete if you are not competent enough?

Maybe it's the Mapuan in my background, but definitely not luck.

I always remember what my mother taught me when I was young "We brought you up in a way that even if you are thrown in the jungle, you would survive.."

So probably, it has a lot to do with one's upbringing as well.

As I mentioned, its the way you take, accept and deal with it.

Ofcourse, everyone's entitled to their own opinion...and so I respect yours.
farthestpoint
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Sep 22, 2008
This topic is very informative, yet I came to know Mr. Racism. I just knew today that he is very Famous in every parts of the Human world.

To be serious, I think RACISM is natural specially on Human. Try to observe a child, and you will know the reality. :lol:

It depends on a decent person to deal with it, one thing I knew. What you throw will always comes back to you. :wink:

So be extra careful, Mrs. Karma is just around the corner.
SicnarFranciS
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Sep 23, 2008
farthestpoint wrote:I am so sorry to hear your story and opinion pinoy1 but I could not agree with your post here.

I had worked for M-I SWACO, a Smith/Schlumberger company dominated by westerners and men in the Oil & Gas Industry, the principle is the same.

I had worked for a local company owned by Arabs, with mixed nationalities from Russians, Germans, Arabs, Indians & Filipinos, the principle remains the same.

Right education? Ofcourse. And please do not undermine the education system of Asian or 3rd World countries. You should know better than that. Just look at the history. Just remember the Moon Buggy - one of the inventors is a Filipino - Mapuan, that is.

How do you expect to compete if you are not competent enough?

Maybe it's the Mapuan in my background, but definitely not luck.

I always remember what my mother taught me when I was young "We brought you up in a way that even if you are thrown in the jungle, you would survive.."

So probably, it has a lot to do with one's upbringing as well.

As I mentioned, its the way you take, accept and deal with it.

Ofcourse, everyone's entitled to their own opinion...and so I respect yours.


No need to feel sorry for me, it's not MY story :wink:. It's just an observation. Of course it may not be true all the time, but it is true most of the time. You have to be observant and be around people who actually experienced it.

I've got several friends who have excellent educational backgrounds and work history- some of them are from Mapua, like you and me (not that that makes any difference). As engineers with a good background you'd think they'll get salary offers fairly, but no, they're offered salaries that does not even reach 5 digits.
You can demand for a higher salary but that'll likely put you out of the game as those companies can always find the next desperate 3rd world sucker who'll bite on that, right?. How do you compete in a situation like that?

No don't get me wrong, I'm not undermining our education, definitely not! I'm talking about how the companies undermine the kind of education 3rd world people have.

Well it seems the companies you've worked for indeed recognised your abilities and competence (no offense, but maybe your pretty face might have helped to some extent). Good for you! But I'm afraid those kinds of companies are few around here.
pinoy1
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Sep 23, 2008
Viva Mapua!

That's the issue, it's the way they are dealing with the situation.

Never ever undersell yourself regardless of the fact that there would be other "3rd world suckers" as you call it, who would take the job! Hey come on, if in the very beginning that's how the company is already treating you, why would you further associate yourselves with them? No way! Not unless you haven't impressed them enough.

Me, my pretty face & to die-for figure? Maybe it helped in the first few minutes....but after more than five minutes, believe me they would stopped thinking with their pr!cks.

I didn't graduate being 9th in top rank for nothing. But I'm sure happy with my physic.

PS: The pretty face & to-die for figure is a joke! :lol:
farthestpoint
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Sep 26, 2008
You are indeed correct, but what about those individuals who have no ideas and knowledge about this things that we are talking about? I think they should be the one who needs to know this information. In the first place this should be the right thing to do, but then I guess it would depends on individuals thoughts.

Viva Mapua! Is that a name of a School/University?
SicnarFranciS
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Sep 26, 2008
SicnarFranciS wrote:You are indeed correct, but what about those individuals who have no ideas and knowledge about this things that we are talking about? I think they should be the one who needs to know this information. In the first place this should be the right thing to do, but then I guess it would depends on individuals thoughts.

Viva Mapua! Is that a name of a School/University?


No, Viva Mapua is not the name of the school. It's a common practiced expression that a Mapuan says to another Mapuan as a sign of greeting couple up with a bit of pride. :)

Let me share an enlightenment:

Mapúa Institute of Technology - Name of the School
"Best Engineering School in the Philippines" - as always quoted by the press
When you are a Mapuan, the companies in the Philippines prioritize you to be hired in engineering positions.
When you are a Mapuan, in the Philippines, you always gets a reaction "wow, you're a Mapuan"

If you are interested, below is a good source of information of some of our Mapúa graduates.

Mapúa Grad Designs Engine Harness for Luxury Cars Jaguar and Land Rover

Mapúa Institute of Technology Mechanical Engineering graduate Jose Ronaldo C. Roque, is the designer of the routing of electrical engine wiring harness (including the fixing and position) for the XKR and XJ models of luxury car manufacturer Jaguar.

The XKR was hailed as the European Car of the Year in 2006 when it was first unveiled to the public. Aside from the Jaguar models, Roque is also behind the designs of the Land Rover, Range Rover and Discovery 3 engine harnesses for the 2006 and 2007 models.

Even as a student in Mapúa, he already showed particular interest in engine and wire harnesses, with his graduate thesis being on “Wiring Harness Manufacturing”. After graduation, Roque first trained in Yazaki-Torres Manufacturing Inc., Philippines before he was sent to the US Atlanta branch of the same company to work for a year. The aforementioned design is his first engine harness assignment in the Yazaki Company. Jaguar commissioned Yazaki for this project.

Currently, Roque is based in Coventry, considered as the car manufacturing center in the United Kingdom, where he has been working as a design engineer for six years.

During a phone interview with Roque’s father Generoso, likewise a Mapúa graduate majoring in Electrical Engineering, the latter said that he was extremely proud of his son’s accomplishments.

*********Renowned Mapuans************

1. DR. LEON CHUA
A professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California at Berkeley, Dr. Leon O. Chua is widely recognized as the father of nonlinear circuit theory and cellular neural networks (CNN). The CNN architecture is the only one implemented into a practical fully-programmable chip for solving ultra-high-speed pattern recognition and image processing problems. The CNN universal machine chip is capable of a thousand times greater performance in speed, weight and power consumption than related technologies. Dr. Chua also invented a five-element circuit for generating chaotic signals. Aptly named the Chua Circuit, it is used by many researchers to design secure communications systems based on chaos.

An IEEE Fellow, he is a past president of the IEEE Circuits and Systems Society and former editor of the IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems.

Dr. Leon Chua, (BSEE)- Former Dept Chair, University of California, Berkeley, Electrical Engineering. First recipient of the 2005 Gustav Kirchhoff Award---the highest IEEE Technical Field Award for outstanding contributions to the fundamentals of any aspect of electronic circuits and systems; recipient of the IEEE Neural Networks Pioneer Award in 2000, the IEEE Browder J. Thompson Memorial Prize in 1972, the IEEE W. R. G. Baker Prize in 1978, the Frederick Emmons Award in 1974, and the M. E. Van Valkenhurg Award in 1995 and 1998; holder of 7 US patents and 8 honorary doctorates and recognized by the Institute of Scientific Information as one of the top 15 most-cited authors in all fields of engineering during 1991-2001.

Education:
Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urban-Champaign, 1964MSEE.,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1961
BSEE, Mapua Institute of Technology, 1959

The applet shows a simulation of Chua's circuit, plotting the voltage measured across C1 against the voltage measured across C2. This corresponds to the display on an X-Y oscilloscope with probes connected across these capacitors. The initial values of the parameters used in the applet correspond to the component values in the circuit diagram, and show a simple periodic orbit (oscillation). The transition to chaotic dynamics can be found by carefully decreasing R or C1, (e.g. decrease R in steps of 0.01 to 1.2K). The simulation compares well with what is actually seen on an oscilloscope. Chaos seems to develop via a subharmonic cascade.
If you do not have access to an oscilloscope, you can use the voltage across C1 or C2 as the input to a high input impedance audio amplifier (with the component values shown the frequency of the oscillations is in the audio range). It turns out that the ear is very sensitive to the development of a weak subharmonic. The subharmonic becomes the fundamental an octave below the original tone, and the ear hears the note drop an octave even when the intensity of the new fundamental is very weak. The first two or three transitions in the subharmonic cascade route to chaos, and the onset of chaos (noise!) are very audible.

2. DR. DIOSDADO BANATAO
Chairman, Managing Partner
Tallwood Venture Capital

Engineer / Inventor

His contributions to the computer industry include: the first single-chip, 16-bit microprocessor-based calculator (while at Commodore in 1976); the first single-chip MicroVAX for Digital Equipment; the first 10-Mbit Ethernet CMOS with silicon coupler data-link control and transreceiver chip; got 3Com into the Ethernet PC add-in card business (while at Seeq in early 1980s); the first system logic chip set for the PC-XT and the PC-AT in 1985; and the first enhanced graphics adapter chip set among many others.

Dado Banatao is the managing partner of Tallwood Venture Capital. With his past experiences as an entrepreneur, Dado provides Tallwood with a unique perspective. As an engineer, he is credited with developing several key semiconductor technologies and is regarded as a Silicon Valley visionary. As an investor, he has a keen sense of trends and opportunities involving technology solutions for computing and communications.

Prior to forming Tallwood, Mr. Banatao was a venture partner at the Mayfield Fund. He has co-founded three technology startups, S3 (SBLU), Chips & Technologies (INTC), and Mostron. He has also held positions at National Semiconductor, Seeq Technologies, Intersil, and Commodore International. In 1997, he was honored with the prestigious Master Entrepreneur of the Year Award sponsored by Ernst & Young, Inc. Magazine, and Merrill Lynch Business Financial Services.

Mr. Banatao serves as Chairman for SiRF Technology (SIRF) and current Tallwood portfolio companies. He also served as Chairman and led investments in Marvell Technology Group (MRVL), Acclaim Communications, acquired by Level One (INTC), Newport Communications, acquired by Broadcom (BRCM), Cyras Systems, acquired by Ciena (CIEN), and Stream Machine, acquired by Cirrus Logic (CRUS). He holds a B.S.E.E., cum laude, from the Mapua Institute of Technology in the Philippines and an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from Stanford University.

Banatao is most known for introducing the first single-chip graphical user interface accelerator that made computers work a lot faster and for helping develop the Ethernet controller chip that made Internet possible. In 1989, he pioneered the local bus concept for personal computers and in the following year developed the First Windows accelerator chip. Intel is now using the chips and technologies developed by Banatao. He now runs his own semiconductor company, Mostron and Chips & Technology, which is based in California's Silicon Valley.

Considered as the Bill Gates of Asia.

3. DR. ARTURO ALCARAZ- MAPUA
Arturo Pineda Alcaraz

ARTURO PINEDA ALCARAZ was born in Manila, the Philippines, on March 21, 1916, the second child of Conrado Alcaraz and Paz Pineda. As a government auditor the elder Alcaraz moved frequently, so his five children attended schools in a number of different towns. ARTURO completed elementary school at Lucena, Quezon Province, in southern Luzon, in 1929. His father was then transferred to Camarines Norte, where ARTURO took his first year of high school, and then to Baguio City.

Going to high school in the cool hills of Baguio, which was then a pleasant small town, was a "wonderful experience" for the boy. In the early 1930s the region was enjoying a mining boom and Leopoldo Faustino, a cousin of his father and one of the first Filipinos to earn a doctorate in geology, was then Head of the Division of Mines of the Bureau of Science. He spoke so highly to the young man of mining as a career that when ALCARAZ graduated at the top of his class from Baguio City High School in 1933, he sought to prepare for that profession. Since there was no school of mining in the Philippines, he entered the College of Engineering, University of the Philippines in Manila. A year later when Mapua Institute of Technology, also in Manila, offered a degree in mining engineering, ALCARAZ transferred there, receiving a Bachelor of Science in Mining Engineering from Mapua in 1937.

Arturo Alcaraz - Volcanologist: Doctor Arturo Alcaraz is a volcanologist specializing in geothermal energy development. In 1967, Arturo Alcaraz and team powered an electric light bulb using steam-powered electricity, Power coming from a Volcano near the town of Tiwi. This was the first geothermal power generated in the Philippines.

ALCARAZ is the First Prominent expert in the field of Geothermal Energy and Mining.

....there are more, but it will take the whole site to post it! hahahahah :) :) :)

---so that's Mapua! :)


....next time you want to hire someone? Hire a Mapuan! :lol: :lol: :lol: ...but then most of them doesn't really run out of jobs...ofcourse, as always, there are exceptions to the rule.
farthestpoint
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Sep 26, 2008
SicnarFranciS wrote:You are indeed correct, but what about those individuals who have no ideas and knowledge about this things that we are talking about? I think they should be the one who needs to know this information. In the first place this should be the right thing to do, but then I guess it would depends on individuals thoughts.

Viva Mapua! Is that a name of a School/University?


To answer your other query, I am indeed letting them know how to deal with situations as such. Most of my Mapuan friends are in good positions & salary range here in Dubai. I had helped them come here but ofcourse, they made their own way -- I just acted as a guide and support in the beginning.

27 years old female, Sale Supervisor at a multi-national company (she's a friend who replaced me when I left the company -- Mapuan :) ) - Oil & Gas Industry

27 years old male - IT Manager - IT Company ( Mapuan :) )

27 years old female - Assistant to the CEO - Swiss Automation Company ( Mapuan :) )

31 year old male, Retail Sales Manager for a multi-national company - Automation ( Mapuan :) )

And they are earning really well here if you compare to the same age bracket in the same positions in all nationalities. No chance for discrimination. All cards laid down. That's how it worked for us in terms of career.

In each and every nationality, we can't generalize all the time. There would always be people out there who would be able to leverage themselves in this playing field.

Most important -- bring in money to the company be it in terms of added company/business value, direct sales, top notch service -- results in short (but results that could be linked to direct/indirect company profit). At the end of the day, why companies exist? To make money. So let them make money through you. And you make money through them. Know it, let the company know it, then negotiate. If you're not happy with the result of negotiation, thank you very much I am leaving. Simple. :)

Not all my experiences are good, I had to leave one company before because they could not give my demands...and so I said bye, bye. They requested 3 months turn-over after I handed over my irrevocable resignation. The other company who wants to hire me is willing to wait 3 months.

And that was one of the highlights of my career here, because the competitor wanted to hire me as well, and I know all the hoops of the company upto worldwide sales figures and dirty deals -- in short, I could be destructive in business. Being a person with sets of principles, I did not accept the offer of the competitor, I just turned it down and decided to leave that industry altogether and move to another one that I foresee could lead me to having my own company in 2-3 years time.

The way I handled things worked out for me. Why would it not work out for somebody else?
farthestpoint
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Oct 02, 2008
Wow!!!Good to hear your stories, I would say Viva La Isla Pilipina? Just kidding, it's good for you and your friends to have at list a quality education from that University. I would say you are proud to be one of them/products of the school.

By the way are you an Engineer? But then I guess, having a good job here in Dubai is purely luck, with a proper education and professionalism plus good working experienced. Then it would be easier for you to fish, big fish are just around the corner, waiting to eat that nice bait.

There are some unfortunate people out there...so I would say I am lucky to have a good and stable income.


In each and every nationality, we can't generalize all the time. There would always be people out there who would be able to leverage themselves in this playing field.

Exactly I agree on your point above...yes and I guess all the Nationalities leaving this country.

By the way, why don't we form an organization that will fight RACISM? Instead of fighting our words here, sitting on the chair. We knew it on ourselves why don't we spread the words.I think Dubai Forum has a few members that can start a few actions.
SicnarFranciS
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Oct 05, 2008
As much as I would love to SicnarFranciS....I don't much have time at hand, just way too busy.

Would love to join if you'd start. I could be the Lady Ambassador of Anti-Racism :lol: :lol: :lol:

You lead the way.
farthestpoint
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Oct 05, 2008
I'm tolerant of different races.
puppypup
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Oct 07, 2008
^ Except when they mistake you for an Asian huh? :wink:
pinoy1
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Oct 07, 2008
i can only speak for myself...luckily in my field (creative/technical) people within the circle value you more based on your skills and capabilities and goes pass the skin color.
dunebasher
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Oct 07, 2008
dunebasher wrote:i can only speak for myself...luckily in my field (creative/technical) people within the circle value you more based on your skills and capabilities and goes pass the skin color.


When the creative hand starts working, skin colour disappears :blob5:

It's difficult to go beyond politics in that manner for it will always be your work. :lol: :lol: :lol:

That's great.
farthestpoint
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Oct 07, 2008
I agree with the other poster that said the discrimination in Dubai is based more on nationality than skin colour. People operating with an American passport can often obtain a higher salary compared to those with Indian, Philippines etc. passports. Then, outside of work matters, you feel the tensions based on your gender, religion and cultural background. In Dubai there are plenty of reasons why people are prejudiced against one another. Perhaps it is like that everywhere... I certainly didn't feel it to be as extreme back in Canada. I'm a whitey though, and we supposedly live charmed lives and are the ones doing all the oppressing. :wink:
kanelli
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Oct 08, 2008
^No, Arab men asking for sexo from non-Asians but calling them Asians are the oppressors.

pinoy1 wrote:^ Except when they mistake you for an Asian huh? :wink:


I unfortunately have intolerance for the intellectually challanged not races. If one mistakes me for Asian it's because that person lacks a brain or vision. It has nothing to do the person's race.
puppypup
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Oct 09, 2008
kanelli wrote: ...I'm a whitey though, and we supposedly live charmed lives and are the ones doing all the oppressing. :wink:


Hahaha! not excactly oppressors.
Since time in memorial the appearance of white man in non-white regions in the world is a sign of divinity and he is actually considered a god or some superioir being.
I think it's a natural tendency of human beings to regard white-skinned peoples as more superior.
And so if one is to choose between whitey and none-white, whitey somehow has an advantage, especially if the one chosing is non-white himself.
And,if you're white and even if you don't have that 'supeior' attitude, you must be enjoying those priviledges of having white skin. :wink:

Still, there are people who can see beyond skin color.
pinoy1
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Oct 10, 2008
pinoy1 wrote:Still, there are people who can see beyond skin color.


yes you're correct, go to NEW YORK and you will see dominant BLACK people. Some of them says it's better to become black.

But I still love to work in a multinational company. RACISM is always there, it depends on how you handle the situation.
SicnarFranciS
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Jan 12, 2009
Caste and colour is given by God. Discrimination on the basis of colour is one of the most brutal thing a man can do to his fellow human being.
bhomes
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